Music and Soviet Power 1917-1932

Marina Frolova-Walker and Jonathan Walker

Language: In English

The Revolution! The Civil War! The New State! The world looked on at what might have become a new utopia. That it didn’t happen we now know but the 1920s were an exciting period of invention in all walks of Russian life. Music was no exception, as revealed in this new book Music and Soviet Power 1917-1932 by Marina Frolova-Walker and Jonathan Walker. The authors present their work amidst live performance of some true rarities such as Mosolov’s Four Advertisements for voice and piano and some very rarely heard piano pieces.

The October Revolution of 1917 tore the fabric of Russian musical life: institutions collapsed, and leading composers emigrated or fell into silence. But in 1932, at the outset of the ‘socialist realist’ period, a new Stalinist music culture was emerging. Between these two dates lies a turbulent period of change which this book charts year by year. It sheds light on the vicious power struggles and ideological wars, the birth of new aesthetic credos, and the gradual increase of Party and state control over music, in the opera houses, the concert halls, the workers’ clubs, and on the streets.

Music and Soviet Power 1917-1932 is published by Boydell Press.

MARINA FROLOVA-WALKER is Reader in Music History at the University of Cambridge and Fellow of Clare College, Cambridge.

JONATHAN WALKER , who has a PhD in Musicology, is a freelance writer, teacher and pianist.

Hello, World!