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SOLD OUT: THE 6TH PUSHKIN HOUSE ANNUAL BOOK PRIZE AWARD CEREMONY & DINNER

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This event is now SOLD OUT

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THE 6TH PUSHKIN HOUSE

ANNUAL BOOK PRIZE AWARD CEREMONY & DINNER

A prize for the very best non-fiction writing on Russia 

at the Great Chamber, The Charterhouse, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6AN

JOIN THE SHORTLISTED AUTHORS AND JURORS FOR THE UNVEILING OF THE 2018 WINNER IN THE ATMOSPHERIC CHARTERHOUSE

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The 2018 shortlisted titles are (click on each for more information):  

∙  Armageddon and Paranoia: The Nuclear Confrontation. Rodric Braithwaite (Profile Books)

∙  Other Russias. Victoria Lomasko. (Penguin), translated from the Russian by Thomas Campbell (first published by n+1)

∙  The War Within: Diaries From the Siege of Leningrad. Alexis Peri. (Harvard University Press)

∙  Stalin’s Meteorologist: One Man’s Untold Story of Love, Life, and Death. Olivier Rolin. (Penguin) translated from the French by Ros Schwartz

∙  The House of Government: A Saga of the Russian Revolution. Yuri Slezkine. (Princeton University Press)

∙  Gorbachev: His Life and Times. William Taubman. (Simon & Schuster)

The panel of judges for the 2018 Pushkin House Russian Book Prize comprises: Sir Nick Clegg (chair), Deputy Prime Minister in Britain’s Coalition Government 2010-15; Rosalind Blakesley, Head of the department of the history of art at Cambridge University; Oleg Budnitsky, Professor at the National Research University Higher School of Economics; Dervla Murphy, Irish author; and John Thornhill, innovation editor of the Financial Times and a former Moscow Bureau Chief.

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The 2018 Pushkin House Russian Book Prize is made possible thanks to generous support by by Douglas Smith(author and winner of the inaugural award in 2013) and Stephanie Ellis-Smith and the Polonsky Foundation.

About The Charterhouse

The Charterhouse is a former 14th-century Carthusian monastery and burial ground for victims of the Black Death, which opened its doors to the public for the first time in 400 years las year.  The complex of almshouses is surrounded by gardens and cobbled courtyards and is just round the corner from Farringdon Station and the Smithfield Meat Market. It is a hidden gem of great atmosphere just outside