Poetry on the Move Season 2017 - 2018

To mark the centenary of the Russian revolution, Pushkin House broke out into Bloomsbury Square with an artistic installation about Russian poetry in exile from 18 October - 10 November, 2017. Entitled '101st km - Further Everywhere', this pavilion, by leading Russian artist and architect, Alexander Brodsky, celebrated the power of the word and the individual voice. 

The 101st km, a concept well known in Russia, refers to the distance that poets and others were forced to maintain from major cities, often after returning from the labour camps – a kind of internal exile and attempt by the authorities to suppress them.The pavilion creates a refuge for these voices, which passers-by are invited to enter and experience.The second part of the title 'further everywhere' refers to the poetic and mysterious announcement heard on local trains leaving from Moscow, a general denominator for calling points after the centre of the city, that conjures up the vast expanses of Russia, and the rest of the world beyond its borders – wherever the exiled is forced to go.

The poets include Marina Tsvetaeva and Vladislav Khodasevich, who emigrated in the early 1920s when the working conditions for free artistic practice became restricted, as well as poets who suffered under Stalin's oppression and purges, such as Osip Mandelshtam and Daniil Kharms. Other poets lived through the purges and stood against the system, only to be quietened down and demeaned by it, such as Boris Pasternak and Anna Akhmatova. Included are also later generations of poets such as Joseph Brodsky and Natalya Gorbanevskaya who had their voices silenced by the regime and were forced to emigrate in the 1970s.

To accompany the pavilion, we have an ongoing season of poetry readings, called 'Poetry on the Move,' that will continue throughout the winter. For this we are collaborating with Modern Poetry in Translation and colta.ru website. Pushkin House is using the important occasion of the centenary of the revolution to return to the heart of our work: poetry, literature, and cultural exchange through language. We are inviting some of the best translators working with Russian poetry today, as well as leading Russian poets for recitals and talks.

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Poetry on the Move is supported by the Case Foundation

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Past Events:

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ПОЭТИЧЕСКИЙ ВЕЧЕР С СЕРГЕЕМ ГАНДЛЕВСКИМ

Сергей Гандлевский - один из самых выдающихся поэтов в России сегодня. Он характеризует свою поэзию как “критический сентиментализм”. В вечере также примет участие архитектор Александр Бродский. 

 

 

 


LEONID PASTERNAK AND HIS DAUGHTERS, AS TOLD BY HIS GRANDCHILDREN

An evening with the descendants of the Pasternak family, talking about the lives and work of artist Leonid Pasternak, father of Boris Pasternak, and his daughters Josephine and Lydia, who lived in England for most of their lives after emigrating with their father in 1921 to Berlin, and coming to England in the 1930s. Boris and his brother remained in Russia. The talk will be given by three of Leonid's grandchildren: Michael, Ann and Nicholas Pasternak Slater - niece and nephews of Boris Pasternak. 


LIVING WITH AKHMATOVA AND TSVETAEVA, A TALK WITH POETS & TRANSLATORS SASHA DUGDALE, MONIZA ALVI & VERONIKA KRASNOV

Translators and poets Sasha Dugdale, Moniza Alvi and Veronika Krasnova discuss the experience of translating Anna Akhmatova, Marina Tsvetaeva, Natalya Gorbanevskaya and other Russian poets, and explore the influence of these poets on their own poetry. In collaboration with Modern Poetry in Translation. 

 


TALK AND POETRY RECITAL WITH MARIA STEPANOVA

Pushkin House is delighted to present leading poet, essayist and journalist Maria Stepanova as part of our season: 101st km - Further Everywhere, marking the centenary of the Russian revolution with a pavilion on Bloomsbury Square dedicated to the fate of suppressed Soviet poets and celebrating their voices. Before giving a reading of her own poetry, Stepanova will give a short talk about suppressed and persecuted poets in Soviet Russia and their influence on her own poetry. In collaboration with Modern Poetry in Translation. 

 


POETRY EVENING WITH EVGENIYA LAVUT: GENERATION 2000-2010S: ROOTS OF THE UNROOTED AND RULES OF THE UNCENSORED

In a personal view of today's poetry scene in Russia, leading Russian poet Evgeniya Lavut will trace the development of hermeticism and irony from the poetic language of the late Soviet period in the poetry of the new generation. Reading poems by significant modern authors and showing some video fragments, she will illustrate how Russian poetry survives and manages not to break with its strong tradition in the era of performance and digital art. Lavut will also read some of her own poetry.