Marking the centenary of the Russian revolution, the 101st km Further Everywhere Pavilion by ALEXANDER BRODSKY is about Russian poetry - and creativity - in exile. The pavilion celebrates the power of the word and the individual voice and a display inside Pushkin House will continue the theme and tell stories of repressed literature in Soviet times. A rich programme of events will explore the theme in more depth through lectures, poetry readings, photographs, film screenings and concerts. 

101 kilometres refers to the distance that people returning from the Gulag, such as poets, artists and writers, had to maintain from cities. Taking the distance metaphorically, the installation addresses the idea of exile through a display of poetry, written by persecuted poets or those who emigrated in Soviet times. 

To accompany the pavilion, we are holding a season of poetry readings, called 'Poetry on the Move,' that will continue throughout the winter. For this we are collaborating with Modern Poetry in Translation and colta.ru website. Pushkin House is using the important occasion of the centenary of the revolution to return to the heart of our work: poetry, literature, and cultural exchange through language.

We are inviting some of the best translators working with Russian poetry today, as well as leading Russian poets for recitals and talks.

Please see below for the full line up of our events, which can also be found on our home page, and which will be updated over the coming weeks. 

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7pm, 19 October 2017- KEEP MY WORDS FOREVER

Screening of film about the life and fate of poet Osip Mandelstam, that combines animation, puppet theatre, and documentary. Followed by a discussion with its director Roma Liberov. In Russian with English subtitles. Q&A in English. READ MORE & BOOK

7pm, 25 October 2017 - THE TRAGEDY OF THE RUSSIAN POET WITH ROBERT CHANDLER, MARKUS LÄHTEENMÄKI AND CLEMENTINE CECIL

During the Soviet era, poetry became a dangerous, subversive activity. This discussion between leading translator of Russian poetry Robert Chandler, curator of Pushkin House pavilion 101st km: Further Everywhere, Markus Lähteenmäki, and Pushkin House Director Clementine Cecil, will explore the lives, fate and work of Soviet poets who lived in internal exile or who emigrated. In English. READ MORE & BOOK

7pm, 31 October 2017 - LIVING WITH AKHMATOVA AND TSVETAEVA, A TALK WITH POETS & TRANSLATORS SASHA DUGDALE, MONIZA ALVI & VERONIKA KRASNOV

Translators and poets Sasha Dugdale, Moniza Alvi and Veronika Krasnova discuss the experience of translating Anna Akhmatova, Marina Tsvetaeva, Natalya Gorbanevskaya and other Russian poets, and explore the influence of these poets on their own poetry. In collaboration with Modern Poetry in Translation. In English. READ MORE & BOOK

5pm, 4 November 2017 - TALK AND POETRY RECITAL WITH MARIA STEPANOVA

Pushkin House is delighted to present leading poet, essayist and journalist Maria Stepanova as part of our season: 101st km - Further Everywhere, marking the centenary of the Russian revolution with a pavilion on Bloomsbury Square dedicated to the fate of suppressed Soviet poets and celebrating their voices. Before giving a reading of her own poetry, Stepanova will give a short talk about suppressed and persecuted poets in Soviet Russia and their influence on her own poetry. In collaboration with Modern Poetry in Translation. In English and Russian. READ MORE & BOOK

7pm, 6 November 2017 - POETRY RECITAL: 101ST KM - THE FATE OF RUSSIAN POETS/ПОЭТИЧЕСКИЙ ВЕЧЕР: 101-Й КМ - УЧАСТЬ РУССКИХ ПОЭТОВ 

An evening dedicated to poetry written by Russian poets who were persecuted during the Soviet era. It will include poems by poets who were imprisoned, forced into exile or executed, who perished in prison or prison-camp or who were silenced or denounced by the Soviet regime. In English and Russian. READ MORE AND BOOK

7pm, 8 November 2017 - POETRY EVENING WITH EVGENIYA LAVUT: GENERATION 2000-2010S: ROOTS OF THE UNROOTED AND RULES OF THE UNCENSORED

In a personal view of today's poetry scene in Russia, leading Russian poet Evgeniya Lavut will trace the development of hermeticism and irony from the poetic language of the late Soviet period in the poetry of the new generation. Reading poems by significant modern authors and showing some video fragments, she will illustrate how Russian poetry survives and manages not to break with its strong tradition in the era of performance and digital art. Lavut will also read some of her own poetry. In English and Russian. READ MORE AND BOOK

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Poetry on the Move is supported by the Case Foundation